Women’s Fashion Industry Has Been a Part of Chinese Culture in 1970.

chinese-fashion

Mainland China has changed physically as a result of changes arising from the continuity of traditions. Clothing has been considered a requirement of life by the Chinese from ancient times, with traditional Chinese outfits primarily made of brilliant hues. In 1978, Chinese fashion was modernized by establishing a liberal fashion policy, allowing it to embrace western culture.

chinese-fashion

By the 1980s, a wide range of clothing styles had emerged, including cotton pullovers, t-shirts, jackets, and skirts, among others. Many apparel boutiques oriented at Chinese clientele opened in the 1990s, particularly in Beijing, Shanghai, and Shenzhen, among other cities.

The changing women fashion in mainland china

Each culture has its own set of values and practices; the Chinese culture, for example, is impacted by the way they dress. Current fashion encompasses more than just clothes; it also includes haircuts, slender bodies, and other characteristics,  leading to many young ladies craving the “ideal” lifestyle.

Ad

Women were reclaiming control of their personhood one step at a time in the early 1970s, and that included their wardrobes.

Women were reclaiming control of their personhood one step at a time in the early 1970s, and that included their wardrobes. Women were given the freedom to choose their own fashions for the first time in history in 1970.

According to Chinese traditional wear, the costume is abandoned and only worn on special occasions; however, fashion trends vary from time to time, and Chinese attire is adjusted and developed to meet modern tastes. A modern autumn Chinese attire based on the classic Cheongsam dress is shown below,  The western and modern cultures have been welcomed by Chinese ladies.

Ad

The New Culture Movement, which was founded on feminism and the autonomous woman, was strongly associated with this style of clothing. Academic women in Shanghai and Beijing were the first to start this new fashion, and while it came to represent a shift in women’s status in Chinese culture.

By Sara Khan

Recommended1 recommendationPublished in Uncategorized