Facts Behind the Hair Loss

It’s normal to shed 50 to 100 hairs a day, and those new ones should grow in their place. Hair loss is not considered life-threatening. But it’s a disease of the spirit that eats away at a person’s self-esteem, and the social development, especially for women, is profound. But a range of factors, including inherited illness and poor nourishment, can interrupt that growth cycle, not just in men but also in women of all ages.

 

Causes

Genetics is the leading cause of hair loss for both genders. For some people, it can happen very slowly over 30 to 40 years. For others, it can happen very soon after puberty. The early signs can be subtle, perhaps a widening part or the need to loop a hair tie more times than usual around a ponytail.

Poor nutrition, yo-yo dieting, stress, medications, and certain illnesses, such as alopecia areata, an autoimmune disorder, can exacerbate a genetic predisposition to hair loss or lead to it on their own. For women, other factors include hormonal fluctuations and damage inflicted by styling tools, hair dyes, and chemical treatments.

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Some rare hair disorders, or even long-term wearing of tight braids and hair extensions, can scar and destroy hair follicles, causing irreversible damage. But many of the conditions leading to chronic hair loss are non-scarring and can potentially be treated, including genetic-pattern baldness.

Getting a diagnosis is a good idea — to determine what kind of hair loss you have and to rule out its connection to another condition, such as low iron or thyroid problems.

By: Hafsa Shafqat

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